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September 08 2019

mr-absentia

@Reuters [video available]: Thousands of Hong Kong protesters chant the U.S. national anthem and call on President Donald Trump to ‘liberate’ the Chinese-ruled city. More here: reut.rs/2UDOEDV

@spacelabtongs: The Chinese & Hong Kong regimes have embarrassed themselves throughout these months on behalf of all Hongkongers. Now we just want the US Congress to #PassHKHumanRightsAndDemocracyAct to end this nonsense.

@nobias_org: This was done by the NED or National Endowment for Democracy (CIA with a different skin), NED had done similar jobs in many countries, Venezuela, Georgia, Ukraine, Lybia, etc. Their goal is to destory each target and make them become US' puppet.

September 07 2019

mr-absentia

China Claims US Behind Hong Kong Protests

October 12, 2014

«Although China has strongly implied that foreigners were secretly controlling the Hong Kong protests in recent weeks, the [People’s Daily] commentary was the first time it so explicitly accused the U.S. of being behind the movement. Its support for this accusation is not very compelling, however, as it mostly focuses on the coverage of independent different media outlets, one of which appears to be a Hong Kong-based online publication.

The commentary begins by noting that, “according to media reports,” Louisa Greve, National Endowment for Democracy’s (NED) the Vice President for Asia, Middle East & North Africa, and Global Programs, met with “key people” in Occupy Central “several months ago” to “talk about the movement.” The unidentified media reports the article references likely refers to an earlier report published in a “Hong Kong-based pro-Beijing newspaper,” according to the Hong Kong-based South China Morning Post. The allegations themselves are most likely based on a NED-hosted public discussion on democracy in Hong Kong between Occupy Central leaders Martin Lee and Anson Chan that was held in Washington, DC in April of this year. Louisa Greve mediated the hour long talk, a video of which is available on YouTube.

The National Endowment for Democracy is a democracy promotion organization that, while administered as a private non-profit organization, receives the bulk of its funding from the U.S. government. In 2013 it gave two grants that together totaled less than $300,000 to two organizations for work on Hong Kong. Only one of those organizations is based in Hong Kong.

However, the National Democratic Institute (NDI), a subsidiary of the NED, does maintain a tiny office in Hong Kong. The Diplomat has learned that NDI’s Hong Kong office typically employs one international staff member and occasionally hires one or two locals to help out when needed. Most of NDI’s work in Hong Kong focuses on holding workshops attended by young leaders from all interested political parties that focus on building skills in areas like public speaking, campaign strategy, message development and message delivery. The Diplomat has learned that NDI has regularly worked with pro-Beijing political parties in Hong Kong who, like all political parties, hope to prevail in local elections. Local Hong Kong press have occasionally accused NDI of being a front for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in the past.

Beyond NED, the People’s Daily article notes that three former U.S. Consuls General to Hong Kong had “recently united” to write an open letter to Hong Kong Chief Executive CY Leung.

Most of the People’s Daily’s claim that the U.S. is trying to foment a color revolution in Hong Kong, however, is based on mainstream newspapers using the term “Umbrella Revolution” in their coverage of the Hong Kong protests. For example, it notes that the Associated Press and Wall Street Journal had used the term “Umbrella Revolution” in their Hong Kong coverage. Neither organization is affiliated with the U.S. government.»

mr-absentia

10 Absurd Conspiracy Theories About China

«Hong Kong Protesters Were US Stooges

This theory is particularly popular with the Chinese government, which claims that the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong last year were linked directly to US government attempts to destabilize China. Pro-Beijing newspaper Wen Wei Po claimed that Joshua Wong, a student leader, had met with US consular officials and even received training from the Marines. Theorists also claimed that opposition leader Benny Tai, a University of Hong Kong law professor, was being paid to rile up sedition by the US State Department through his membership in the Center for Comparative and Public Law, a pro–human rights NGO.

The theory goes that the US is heavily involved in stirring up popular discontent and protests against foreign governments, including staged violence in the 2010 Thailand protests, and that the CIA and other US government organs have similar plans for Hong Kong. The claims of US conspiracy gave the Chinese government justification for sly crackdowns on the protest movement, including paying triads to assault protesters and bringing in masked men from Guangdong to disrupt the protests with violent force. One protester complained of the mainland thugs: “Hong Kong people don’t spit on Hong Kong people. In Hong Kong, they spit on the roads.”»

mr-absentia
  • Hong Kong Crisis: Made in America (New Eastern Outlook, Aug. 24 2019)

    «Claims that Western interests are driving unrest in Hong Kong to undermine China have been decried across the Western media as “fake news,” “disinformation,” and even grounds for censorship from platforms like Facebook and Twitter.

    Yet a look at the organizations directly involved in leading the unrest and those supporting it reveals unequivocally that it originates in Washington DC – not organically from within Hong Kong itself.

    In order to conceal this fact, the Western media has attempted to portray the unrest as “leaderless.” Yet coordinated protests most certainly have both leaders and organizations directing the majority of the movement’s decisions as well as providing the logistical support necessary for the sustained unrest Hong Kong now faces.»

  • Hong Kong’s political heavyweights & their peculiar ties to Washington (RT World News, Sep. 7 2019)

    «Massive protests which gripped Hong Kong this summer have been portrayed as leaderless. Yet, there were people who held clear sway over the crowds. But who directs them?

    As ‘leaderless’ as the crowds of protesters clashing with police on the streets of China’s Special Administrative Region may have seemed, they still were largely influenced by a whole group of public figures, politicians, parties and organizations. And it turns out that some key figures behind the unrest had longstanding ties with the global “beacon of democracy” – Washington, DC.»

Reposted byschaaf schaaf
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